My Aim is True

Slay's book montage

Strangers in Paradise, Fullsize Paperback Volume 13: Flower To Flame
Batman: The Dark Knight Returns
Size 12 Is Not Fat
90-day Geisha: My Time as a Tokyo Hostess
Julius Caesar
How to Talk to a Liberal (If You Must): The World According to Ann Coulter
The Tasha Tudor Book of Fairy Tales
From Hell
I Never Promised You a Rose Garden
Proud Americans


Slay Belle's favorite books »
Recent Tweets @SlayBelle

(via severin)

unpopular:

Don’t be a twat: parody posters tackle anti-social commuters (via)

(via sugaryumyum)

How do you store and organize your physical media? (And digital, too, if you have a good organizational system?)
slaybelle slaybelle Said:

unfuckyourhabitat:

markdoesstuff:

HELLO UFYH I LOVE Y’ALL SO MUCH.

My physical media is organized alphabetically, and then by season if it’s more than a single item. This is actually the only exception to my earlier ask about how I’ve never had a knack for organization, because I always organized by books, vinyls, CDs, and DVDs. I still do it, and god, IT’S SO PLEASING TO LOOK AT.

My books are alphabetized by author, then series, then release date.

Digitally… hmmm. I actually don’t have much digital media anymore aside from what’s on my iPod or iPad, and iTunes beautifully organizes it for me. As for the files associated with Mark Does Stuff, I have a very specific nomenclature that I use to organize all my videos and ebooks, and this is so that I can find them easily. 

it’s usually:

[name of show or, if it is long, abbreviation] + [season number] + [the letter x] + [episode number].

it’s stolen from the way that episode production numbers were written for The X-Files because that is the only show that I have an encyclopedic knowledge of everything ever. so my files look like:

thexfiles3x14 or spn4x01

I always make the episode thing two digits so that they organize in order when sorted.

I LOVED THIS QUESTION,

Mark Does Stuff is the best! (And for anyone with a lot of physical or digital media to organize, he has a great system, so pay attention.)

aslanmedia:

Vulture Magazine interviews Willow Wilson, a Muslim comic artist who created the female Muslim superhero Kamala Khan for Marvel. 

Kamala Khan is a 16 year old child of immigrant parents from Pakistan living in Jersey City who, like any other superhero, fights bad guys and saves the day. Equally as interesting as Kamala is her creator, Willow Wilson, who resembled the average white woman - before she converted to Islam. 

Muslim superhero comics are nothing new— Naif Al-Mutawa from Kuwait created the 99, a group of Muslim superheroes from around the world that resemble all of Allah’s 99 traits. 19 year old Deena Mohamed created the Muslim veiled superhero Qahera who fights social problems affecting women in Egypt. But what Miss Kamala Khan represents is one of the first mainstream Muslim superheroes in the United States

(via ladyfabulous)

thewomanofkleenex:

lovethyfatness:

[Series of texts by @fatnutritionist, which read: “People are mad at me because they ‘work so hard’ to be fit or lose weight. They have told me this explicitly. It implies that they think my rejecting the values they subscribe to can somehow take away the fitness they’ve worked for. That is totally delusional. If you’ve worked hard for fitness, no amount of fat people rejecting stigma can take that away. So this is obviously not actually about fitness, at all. It’s about the other thing they ‘worked hard’ for: social status. They DO think, and they know, that the social status they have worked hard to earn, through ‘fitness,’ can be devalued. It can be devalued if the hierarchy that rewards them is crushed. Crushed by people rejecting stigma. We can’t take away your fitness or whatever weight you’ve lost. But we can devalue those things by destroying fat stigma. So they are afraid of us, and for good reason. If fat people aren’t stigmatized, then there is no more thin privilege. Remember always, fat people: People are afraid of you because you have an awesome power - to destroy the hierarchy. If they were not afraid of losing their place in the hierarchy, they would not come after you so viciously.” All tweets were accompanied by the hashtag, #notyourgoodfatty]

Read the full thread of Michelle’s tweets on Storify.

Well, damn.

(via historic-upstart)

What up, tumblr?

It’s been a while since I saw something so infuriating over on the Gawker sites. Good job, troll, with being a fucking fail of a human being. 

It’s been a while since I saw something so infuriating over on the Gawker sites. Good job, troll, with being a fucking fail of a human being. 

medievalpoc:

girljanitor:

If Tolkien Were Black by Laura Miller (full article here)
N.K. Jemisin (left) and David Anthony Durham  
Looking at the most visible exemplars of epic fantasy — from J.R.R. Tolkien to such bestselling authors as George R.R. Martin and Robert Jordan — a casual observer might assume that big, continent-spanning sagas with magic in them are always set in some imaginary variation on Medieval Britain. There may be swords and talismans of power and wizards and the occasional dragon, but there often aren’t any black- or brown-skinned people, and those who do appear are decidedly peripheral; in “The Lord of the Rings,” they all seem to work for the bad guys.
Our hypothetical casual observer might therefore also conclude that epic fantasy — one of today’s most popular genres — would hold little interest for African-American readers and even less for African-American writers. But that observer would be dead wrong. One of the most celebrated new voices in epic fantasy is N.K. Jemisin, whose debut novel, “The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms,” won the Locus Award for best first novel and nominations for seemingly every other speculative fiction prize under the sun. Another is David Anthony Durham, whose Acacia Trilogy has landed on countless best-of lists. Both authors recently published the concluding books in their trilogies.
Although they came to the genre from different paths, both Jemisin and Durham have used it to wrench historical and cultural themes out of their familiar settings and hold them up in a different light. “I never felt that fantasy needed to be an escape from reality,” Durham told me. “I wanted it to be a different sort of engagement with reality, and one that benefits from having magic and mayhem in it as well.”

In Durham’s trilogy, four royal siblings are deposed and then fight their way back to the throne in an empire presided over by the island city of Acacia. Their dynasty’s power resides in a Faustian bargain made with a league of maritime merchants: the League supplies a rabble-soothing drug in exchange for a quota of the empire’s children, who are sent off across the sea to meet an unknown fate. As promised, “Acacia” is a sweeping yarn filled with adventure, intrigue, sorcery and battles.

Jemisin’s series, too, is set in the capital of an empire that has been run by an aristocratic clan for generations. The power of the Arameri family, however, resides in the gods — specifically a pantheon of deities whom they have imprisoned and enslaved. The narrator of “The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms” is the daughter of a renegade member of the clan who ran off with a foreigner. Raised in a remote kingdom with its own fiercely independent customs, she returns to the capital seeking information about her mother and, once there, becomes embroiled in vicious palace intrigues.

She made the main character a woman and, in an even more marked departure from the norm, she decided to have that character narrate the book in the first person. “I knew that what I was writing was inherently defiant of the tropes of epic fantasy,” Jemisin said, “and I wasn’t sure it would be accepted.”

When Durham decided to write an epic fantasy, he set out to recapture the enchantment he felt as a 12-year-old, discovering Tolkien at his father’s house in Trinidad, while “brushfires and buzzards” ranged over the neighboring hills. Jemisin, on the other hand, based her trilogy on “the old-school epics: not Tolkien, but Gilgamesh.” The gods in her imaginary world evoke the squabbling divine families of the world’s great myths: “The ancient tales of mortals putting up with gods and trying to outsmart gods, of trickster gods outsmarting other gods: That’s the basis of my work.”
“The genre can go many, many more places than it has gone,” said Jemisin. “Fantasy’s job is kind of to look back, just as science fiction’s job is to look forward. But fantasy doesn’t always just have to look back to one spot, or to one time. There’s so much rich, fascinating, interesting, really cool history that we haven’t touched in the genre: countries whose mythology is elaborate and fascinating, cultures whose stories we just haven’t even tried to retell.”

Reblogging for the books tag! (I’ve read both these series myself and they are quite good.)

medievalpoc:

girljanitor:

If Tolkien Were Black by Laura Miller (full article here)

N.K. Jemisin (left) and David Anthony Durham

Looking at the most visible exemplars of epic fantasy — from J.R.R. Tolkien to such bestselling authors as George R.R. Martin and Robert Jordan — a casual observer might assume that big, continent-spanning sagas with magic in them are always set in some imaginary variation on Medieval Britain. There may be swords and talismans of power and wizards and the occasional dragon, but there often aren’t any black- or brown-skinned people, and those who do appear are decidedly peripheral; in “The Lord of the Rings,” they all seem to work for the bad guys.

Our hypothetical casual observer might therefore also conclude that epic fantasy — one of today’s most popular genres — would hold little interest for African-American readers and even less for African-American writers. But that observer would be dead wrong. One of the most celebrated new voices in epic fantasy is N.K. Jemisin, whose debut novel, “The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms,” won the Locus Award for best first novel and nominations for seemingly every other speculative fiction prize under the sun. Another is David Anthony Durham, whose Acacia Trilogy has landed on countless best-of lists. Both authors recently published the concluding books in their trilogies.

Although they came to the genre from different paths, both Jemisin and Durham have used it to wrench historical and cultural themes out of their familiar settings and hold them up in a different light. “I never felt that fantasy needed to be an escape from reality,” Durham told me. “I wanted it to be a different sort of engagement with reality, and one that benefits from having magic and mayhem in it as well.”

image

In Durham’s trilogy, four royal siblings are deposed and then fight their way back to the throne in an empire presided over by the island city of Acacia. Their dynasty’s power resides in a Faustian bargain made with a league of maritime merchants: the League supplies a rabble-soothing drug in exchange for a quota of the empire’s children, who are sent off across the sea to meet an unknown fate. As promised, “Acacia” is a sweeping yarn filled with adventure, intrigue, sorcery and battles.

image

Jemisin’s series, too, is set in the capital of an empire that has been run by an aristocratic clan for generations. The power of the Arameri family, however, resides in the gods — specifically a pantheon of deities whom they have imprisoned and enslaved. The narrator of “The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms” is the daughter of a renegade member of the clan who ran off with a foreigner. Raised in a remote kingdom with its own fiercely independent customs, she returns to the capital seeking information about her mother and, once there, becomes embroiled in vicious palace intrigues.

image

She made the main character a woman and, in an even more marked departure from the norm, she decided to have that character narrate the book in the first person. “I knew that what I was writing was inherently defiant of the tropes of epic fantasy,” Jemisin said, “and I wasn’t sure it would be accepted.”

image

When Durham decided to write an epic fantasy, he set out to recapture the enchantment he felt as a 12-year-old, discovering Tolkien at his father’s house in Trinidad, while “brushfires and buzzards” ranged over the neighboring hills. Jemisin, on the other hand, based her trilogy on “the old-school epics: not Tolkien, but Gilgamesh.” The gods in her imaginary world evoke the squabbling divine families of the world’s great myths: “The ancient tales of mortals putting up with gods and trying to outsmart gods, of trickster gods outsmarting other gods: That’s the basis of my work.”

“The genre can go many, many more places than it has gone,” said Jemisin. “Fantasy’s job is kind of to look back, just as science fiction’s job is to look forward. But fantasy doesn’t always just have to look back to one spot, or to one time. There’s so much rich, fascinating, interesting, really cool history that we haven’t touched in the genre: countries whose mythology is elaborate and fascinating, cultures whose stories we just haven’t even tried to retell.”

Reblogging for the books tag! (I’ve read both these series myself and they are quite good.)

(via therotund)